CASE STUDIES

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The University of Western Australia (UWA) – Library Assistants Redundancies

 

The Brief

Lifeworx was contacted by the Career Development and Transition Professional at The University of Western Australia to run a series of workshops for Library Assistants who were applying for higher level positions within the University. The University was phasing out Level II positions and replacing them with Level III positions and all Level II staff were given the opportunity to apply.

The Client

UWA is a world top 100 university and is the only Western Australian university to be awarded a QS Five Star Plus Rating in the QS Stars University ratings.

Key Objective

The main aim of the contract was to deliver a series of career related workshops to the Level II Library Assistants who were going through a redundancy. These workshops revolved around resume writing, interview techniques, writing selection criteria and job applications.

One on one coaching was also made available to interested participants as well as an opportunity to undergo mock interviews.

Strategies

Considering the sensitive nature of the process, each participant was given a set of resources that they could take away with them and review at a later date should the process become too overwhelming. The Career Development and Transition Professional was on hand should one of the participants become upset, and all participants had access to Lifeworx services either via email or phone on a 24/7 basis for the duration of the contract.

Results

Many of the participants were grateful for the opportunity to attend the workshops, one on one coaching and mock interviews but choose to take the redundancy on offer anyway. Six participants were successful in gaining the higher level role, four went on to gain employment elsewhere, and one lady decided to look into self-employment in a completely different field. The results were so successful that the Career Development and Transition Professional engaged Lifeworx in running similar workshops for other departments within the university.

 

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Development of a suite of on-line Aboriginal specific career tools. The Department of Workforce Development: Careers Centre, Perth

 

The Brief

The Manager of the Career Centre in Perth contacted Lifeworx after reading about the governance and healthy lifestyle program that was run by Lifeworx for women in Kiwirrkurra. He asked Lifeworx to develop a Scoping Document outlining the career development tools currently, readily and easily accessible to Indigenous people in Western Australia. The Scoping Document Lifeworx produced outlined that there was very little in the way of career development tools that were free or accessible without going through private or government agencies.

The Client

The Career Centre, Perth, provide the public with a free career advice service through online career resources, self assessment tools, occupation profiles and one-on-one sessions with qualified career advisors. Free assistance with qualified Career Advisors is available at the Career Centre in the city.

Key Objective

The objective was to rectify the fact that very little Indigenous focused career related tools seemed readily available, especially to those living in remote and regional areas. Lifeworx won the tender to write a suite of on-line resources that would be freely available to Indigenous Western Australians. These tools could be worked through either independently or with the assistance of a career practitioner.  The suite of career related resources included documentation for career practitioners on engaging Indigenous people in discovering personal talents that can be transferred to a future career, links to other websites that can assist in one’s career development, and an interactive, flexible, fun and holistic career development program with appropriate hands on activities to support the individual.

Strategy

Lifeworx underwent an in-depth analysis of what was already currently available in regards to on-line career development tools and discussed options with career practitioners who specialise in working with Aboriginal people in a career development context. The Principle Consultant consulted with a wide variety of private practitioners, Government agencies, Not for Profits and community based organisations throughout Western Australia to gain insight into the most suitable tools in which to build. The Principal Consultant personally visited organisations in Kalgoorlie, Karratha, Broome, Port and South Hedland, as well as Geraldton to discuss the gaps in service provision.

Result

After thorough research, liaising with Indigenous people throughout Western Australia, including those in rural, remote and urban settings, as well as people assisting Indigenous people in a career context, researching methodologies from leading Indigenous career development countries such as Canada, and extensive travel including attendance at Indigenous specific employment seminars, Lifeworx designed a suite of resources that have been included on the new Department of Training and Workforce Development website. These tools include two card sorts, templates with images, pop up boxes and dialogued explanations.

 

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Quality of Life Research – clients: GIFSA and Nulsen

 

The Brief

Lifeworx conducted a series of interviews, assessments and observations over the course of 2013 to assess whether or not the quality of life had improved for six Indigenous people who moved out of aged care facilities into a purpose built facility. In their previous situation, they have little control over their living arrangements and lifestyle choices. Moving into a facility that is set up as a ‘home’ away from home, provided them with more independence and opportunities to be actively involved in daily decision making such as what to wear, what to eat, where to go, whom to visit and when.

The Client

Nulsen, winner of the Disability Services Commission’s 2012 Count Me In Award for Governance and Leadership, in partnership with the Goldfields Individual Family Support Association (GIFSA), established a 24-hour accommodation option for six Aboriginal people in Kalgoorlie. With the combined knowledge of a respected local provider and the professionalism and expertise of Nulsen, this project provided reconnection and a ‘real’ home for people who had been living in inappropriate aged care accommodation. The diversity of the Count Me In Awards demonstrated to the community how access and inclusion can be considered in all aspects of our lives. The Count Me In vision is for all people to live in welcoming communities that facilitate citizenship, friendship, mutual support and a fair go for everyone.

Key Objective

There were two major purposes, one being to analyse the quality of life for six Indigenous people with acquired brain injuries who moved out of current residential care into alternative accommodation and support options. Whilst the second purpose was to assess the effectiveness of the partnership between a metropolitan based disability service organisation (Nulsen) and rural (GIFSA) based not for profit community organisation.

Strategy

Lifeworx developed a set of culturally appropriate tools to measure the quality of life of the six residents over a 12-month period.

The following demographical information was perused:

  • Disability types
  • Health issues identified
  • Mental health problems
  • Behaviours of concern
  • Frequency of visits to and from family and friends
  • Frequency of travel outside of where they live inc: participation in shopping and leisure activities outside of where they live
  • Areas in life that people are supported to make choices
  • Current and desired future role participation
  • Length of time person can be left alone
  • Hours spent watching television per day
  • Family outcome measure

Result

Over the twelve-month period Lifeworx sat with various family members in a variety of settings (such as in the back of cars, remote communities, out bush) to speak with them about their thoughts and feeling of the new residential home. Lifeworx collated all of this information, both quantitative and qualitative, over the twelve-month period and provided this information back to both GIFSA and Nulsen in a highly critical document. This information has since been used across Australia as best practice examples.

For the residents, the results are significant. Family members visited more often and two of the residents are out of their wheelchairs and walking with two wheeler walkers. One of the residents also moves his fingers more, laughs and tries to speak. Family members have stated that they much prefer visiting the home as it doesn’t feel ‘like a prison’ and they can stay for meals. They are also able to bring roo tail for their family members and cook it in the kitchen oven.